2021-2022 Bulletin: Policies and General Information 
    
    Dec 02, 2021  
2021-2022 Bulletin: Policies and General Information

Addendum


The updates listed in this addendum apply to the 2021-2022 Claremont Graduate University Bulletin.  This addendum contains policy changes that received approval after the Bulletin for the academic year was published as well as corrections of errors in the original version of the Bulletin.

Doctoral Degree Regulations: Transdisciplinary Studies Course Requirement

Doctoral students admitted or readmitted in Fall 2004 or later, are required to complete a Transdisciplinary course prior to the completion of 48 units toward their doctoral program, including transfer credits.

To fulfill this requirement, students must enroll in a CGU course section headed by the prefix TNDY and successfully complete the 4-unit course (or two 2-unit TNDY courses). Transfer units and audited courses may not be used to meet this requirement.

The course will count as 4 units towards the doctoral degree requirement. It will not add any additional units to the student’s degree requirements nor count against the total number of transfer units from previous graduate coursework.

Dual Degree Guidelines

Effective Summer 2021
Updated 6/16/2021

Definition of Dual Degree

A dual degree program is a program of study pursued collaboratively between two departments or programs, leading to the award of two separate degrees in different fields/disciplines. With some double-counting of overlapping units, a dual degree program supports students with transdisciplinary academic interests and career goals, while saving time and total cost of the two separate degrees. Dual degrees may be pursued only between disciplines that are sufficiently different as to require separate curricula; dual degrees are not permitted between disciplines that are so close in subject content that almost any course in one area would satisfy a requirement in the other. Generally, dual degrees are not permitted for two degrees offered through the same academic department except by petition1. Examples of dual degrees are two Masters Degrees, a Masters/Ph.D., or an M.B.A/Ph.D.

Dual degrees differ from two other types of degree:

  • an “interfield” degree, which is a single degree based on an integrated program of interdisciplinary work involving two or more fields, such as the interfield degree of politics and economics.
  • a “joint” degree, which is a single degree cosponsored with other institutions, such as the joint Ph.D. program in Education with California State University, San Diego.

Dual degree programs with other institutions are not included in this policy.

Limitations

Number of Degrees:

In accordance with CGU’s policy on multiple degrees , once a student completes two degrees that share units at CGU, no units from either degree may be used toward a subsequent degree except by petition. If a master’s degree is awarded in a field other than the field of the Ph.D., no master’s degree is awarded in the field of the Ph.D.

Formalized and Individual Dual Degree Programs

There are two types of dual-degree programs, formal and individual:

  • Individual programs are programs initiated by individual students according to their special needs and interests (see 5e below).
  • Formal programs are programs whose requirements are explicitly agreed upon and formalized between two departments, such as the M.A. Art Business/MBA or the MBA/Ph.D. Economics.

After a number of students (at least 5) have enrolled in the same individual dual degree program, the Registrar will notify the programs concerned, and the faculties shall be encouraged to prepare a proposal for a formalized dual degree program and submit it to the Academic Standards Committee for approval. From that point on, individual students will complete the formalized program requirements, and individual coursework/dual proposals will not be required. Descriptions and requirements for formalized programs will be included in the CGU Bulletin, program handbooks, and the CGU website.

Coordination of Requirements

  • No more than twelve units from previous degrees may be transferred into a dual Master’s/Doctoral program. No transfer units will be allowed into a dual Master’s degree program.
  • Double-counting units: Of the total units required for each individual degree, no more than 35% of those units may be applied from the other degree program. For example, a Master’s degree of 40 units may apply up to 14 units (35%) from the other program toward its total units and vice-versa. In other words, students must complete at least 65% of the units originally required in each degree. For individualized dual degree programs, the maximum percentage may be less, depending on the point of application (see 5.b below).
  • The reduction of credit requirements brought about by double-counting must be based on the relevance of the courses to the programs and their learning outcomes. Relevance may be indicated by the close relationship of content, mutual complementarity, methodological relevance, other criteria of intellectual relevance, and career goals. If this relevance is not obvious in the dual proposal, the department(s) may be required to submit additional information.
  • All degree requirements and milestones must be met for each degree. A dual degree program may include and require specific expectations for the nature and format of those requirements. Although subject to the requirements specified in this policy, the faculty of each field involved in either a formal or individual dual degree program will have flexibility to determine other matters associated with the dual degree, including, but not limited to, the expectations for meeting research tools requirements in each field; expectations for the nature and format of qualifying examinations, folios, and thesis or dissertation, and any additional requirements or understandings in light of the academic integrity of each degree.
  • It is the responsibility of the advisors to remain informed of the requirements and the student’s progress in each field and to provide appropriate coordination between the fields involved.

Application and Approval Process

  • Some students apply to dual degree options upon their initial application to CGU. Others apply after beginning their first degree.
  • Students are strongly encouraged to apply to the dual degree program prior to completion of 50% of the units of their current program at CGU in order to maximize the benefit of the dual degree.
  • Students who apply to change to an individualized dual degree prior to completing 50% of the units in the first degree may double-count up to 35% of the total units required in each degree. While maintaining the collaboration between programs and the integrity of the two degrees, students may still apply for an individualized dual degree after completing 50% of the units in the first degree, but may double-count up to 25% of the total units required in each degree.
  • Students who apply to a formalized dual degree program after beginning the first degree will complete all expectations for the formal dual degree program, regardless of the point of application.
  • Students must apply to and be accepted by both degrees in which they are going to work.
  • Students must have two advisors, one for each degree.
  • Individualized Dual Degree Programs: Students interested in developing individualized dual-degree programs should first discuss the potential program with their home department and then with the new department. The application process requires the approval of both departments for a Change of Degree Form and a detailed Dual Degree Proposal Form (see below). The new (second) department may require additional application materials and a new personal statement. Forms are available in the Registrar’s online Form Index.
  • The Dual Degree Proposal Form will include a description of the program including: the relevance of the two fields to each other, the number of units to be completed in each field, the allowable transfer units, the number of units and specific courses that will be cross counted in each field, specific courses required in each field, expectations for meeting research tools requirements in each field, expectations for the nature and format of qualifying examinations, folios, and thesis or dissertation, names of academic advisors in each field, and any understanding regarding fellowship funding or additional requirements.
  • With signatures of both advisors and both deans/directors, the programs will send the two forms to the Transdisciplinary Studies Program for review and (if applicable) consultation. The forms are then forwarded to the Registrar’s office for a final check of requirements. Dual Degree Proposal Forms must be completed and filed before the completion of a student’s first semester in the program.
  • Formal Dual Degree Programs: Departments interested in formal dual-degree programs must apply to the Academic Standards Committee for review and approval, following the “Proposal for a Formalized Dual Degree Program” template appended to this policy. The proposal should include: the purpose and general description of the program, a detailed description of program elements and requirements, program oversight responsibilities, and a draft description of the program for the CGU Bulletin, program handbooks, and website. Once the degree is formalized with Academic Standards Committee approval, students apply either directly with their initial application for admission to CGU, or by completing the Change of Degree form if they are already enrolled at CGU.

Petition

On the recommendation of the advisors in both fields, the student may petition to waive specific requirements.

1The approved exceptions are the dual degree programs is MSFE/MBA and MSFE/Math.

Faculty Changes

Extended Faculty Additions

Susan McWilliam Barndt, PhD, Princeton; Pomona College
School of Social Science, Policy & Evaluation
 
Heather Zinn Brooks, PhD, University of Utah; Harvey Mudd College
Institute of Mathematical Sciences
 
Lisa Abrams, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles; Pomona College
School of Social Science, Policy & Evaluation
 
Alison Harris, PhD, Harvard University; Claremont McKenna College
School of Social Science, Policy & Evaluation
 
Azamat Junisbai, PhD, Indiana University; Pitzer College
School of Educational Studies
 
Suyapa Villeda, PhD, Cornell University; Pitzer College
School of Educational Studies
 
Darryl Yong, PhD, University of Washington; Harvey Mudd College
School of Educational Studies
 
Alicia Bonaparte, PhD, Vanderbilt University
School of Educational Studies
 
Ken Gonzales-Day, MFA, University of California, Irvine; Scripps College
School of Arts & Humanities
 
Adrian Pantoja, PhD, Claremont Graduate University; Pitzer College
School of Social Science, Policy & Evaluation
 
Sean Flynn, PhD, University of California, Berkeley; Scripps College
School of Social Science, Policy & Evaluation
 
Mohamed Omar, PhD, University of California, Davis; Harvey Mudd College
Institute of Mathematical Sciences
 
Andrew Bernoff, PhD, University of Cambridge; Harvey Mudd College
Institute of Mathematical Sciences
 
Jemma Lorenat, PhD, Simon Fraser University (Canada) and Université Pierre et Marie Curie (France); Pitzer College
Institute of Mathematical Sciences
 
Haydee Lindo, PhD, University of Utah; Harvey Mudd College
Institute of Mathematical Sciences
 
Winston Ou, PhD, University of Chicago; Scripps College
Institute of Mathematical Sciences
 
David Bachman, PhD, University of Texas at Austin; Pitzer College
Institute of Mathematical Sciences
 
Gabriel Chandler, PhD, University of California, Davis; Pomona College
Institute of Mathematical Sciences
 
Konrad Aguilar, PhD, University of Denver; Pomona College
Institute of Mathematical Sciences
 
Susan Martonosi, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Harvey Mudd College
Institute of Mathematical Sciences
 
Mark Huber, PhD, Cornell University; Claremont McKenna College
Institute of Mathematical Sciences
 
Chiu-Yen Kao, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles; Claremont McKenna College
Institute of Mathematical Sciences
 
Sam Nelson, PhD, Louisiana State University; Claremont McKenna College
Institute of Mathematical Sciences
 
Jon Jacobsen, PhD, University of Utah; Harvey Mudd College
Institute of Mathematical Sciences
 
Michael O’Neill, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles; Claremont McKenna College
Institute of Mathematical Sciences
 
Mike Izbicki, PhD, University of California, Riverside; Claremont McKenna College
Institute of Mathematical Sciences
 
Bill Alves, DMA, University of Southern California; Harvey Mudd College
School of Arts & Humanities
 

Grading

Effective Fall 2021
Updated 9/2/2021

Notation Change: Satisfactory (S) and Unsatisfactory (U) grades have been replaced with Pass (P) and Fail (F) grades. The points  associated with the P and F grades will remain the same as they were for the S and U grades.

Grading Basis Deadline: CGU is now specifying the deadline for when a student may change a class grading basis (e.g., to go from graded to pass/fail, or audit to graded, etc.).

Academic Calendar

Effective Fall 2021
Updated 9/2/2021

Fall 2021

Last day to change grading basis

Regular Session: November 19

Module 1: October 8

Module 2 December 3

Spring 2022

Last day to change grading basis

Regular Session: April 8

Module 1: February 25

Module 2: April 29

Admissions

Effective Fall 2021
Updated 9/8/2021

Rescinding an offer of Admission

An applicant who has been offered admission (admitted applicant) may have the offer rescinded prior to the start of their entry term for any of the following reasons. 1) Misrepresentation or falsification on the part of the applicant during the application process; 2) Actions that violate the university’s  Code of Conduct ; and/or 3) If it is deemed that the applicant’s presence on campus as a student would be detrimental to the institution or campus community.

The decision to rescind an Offer of Admission will be overseen by the academic department and Dean of Admissions and notification will be handled through the Office of Admissions.