2020-2021 Bulletin 
    
    Apr 19, 2021  
2020-2021 Bulletin

Islamic Studies, MA


The Master of Arts in Islamic Studies is designed to give students a strong foundation in Islamic studies. Students receive broad training, with emphases in areas including Qur’anic studies, women in Islam, and Islamic literature.   The program equips students to address issues concerning the relation of Islam to other religious traditions, and to situate the study of Islam within the broader academic study of religion.  The degree provides excellent preparation for doctoral work in Islamic Studies or related disciplines, as well as for various positions of work and service in Muslim communities, nonprofit organizations, and the public sector.

Students admitted to the MA in Islamic Studies should refer to the Religion Student Handbook for the year in which they begin the program for complete details.

Admission requirements are detailed in the Admission  section of the Bulletin.

Degree Requirements

Coursework.  40 units of approved coursework are required for the degree including:

  • 28 units of required courses: “Theories of Religion,” “Introduction to Islamic Studies,” “Classical Islam,” “Literature of the Qur’an,” “Islamic Cosmology & Mysticism,” “Feminism and Qur’anic Studies,” and one other approved course on Islam.
  • 8 units of comparative courses

Arabic. Competency in intermediate Arabic (students may complete intermediate Arabic courses at other institutions and transfer in up to 10 units to fulfill this requirement OR students must pass a translation exam administered by the School of Arts & Humanities to fulfill the requirement). 

Secondary Language Requirement/Research Tool. Fulfilled by passing a foreign language translation exam (other than in Arabic) administered by the School of Arts & Humanities, or, with advisor approval, the Research Tool may be fulfilled by completing an approved research methods course.

Thesis.  The Master’s thesis provides an opportunity for students to gain the skills necessary for writing a publishable piece of work.  Thesis - prepared in consultation with the student’s advisor (for specific guidelines regarding thesis preparation, please consult the Religion Department Student Handbook).

Theses are submitted to the registrar, following published formatting policies and procedures detailed in the Academic Policies - Master’s Degree Regulations  section of the Bulletin. 

University Policies.  University policies detailed in the Academic Policies  section of the Bulletin apply.

 

 

American Studies Concentration


Students will work closely with a faculty advisor to pursue an intellectually unified course of study that will include seminars in their department as well as seminars cross-listed with participating CGU departments and The Claremont Colleges. A minimum of four seminars should be taken in the student’s home department, and a minimum of two seminars in other disciplines. Interested students should discuss this concentration with their advisor.

Note: in some cases, fulfilling the requirements of this concentration as well as the core requirements for the student’s degree may involve additional units or Research Tools.  Students should always consult with their academic advisor before adding a concentration to their degree program.

 

Early Modern Studies Concentration


The Early Modern Studies concentration encompasses study in the disciplines of English, History, and Philosophy, while retaining disciplinary focus in one of those fields.  Students interested in this concentration should consult with Dr. Lori Anne Ferrell.

For master’s students, this discrete course of study complements coursework in archival and museum studies and/or prepares students for application to doctoral programs in early modern, Renaissance, or Reformation literature, history, or philosophy.

For doctoral students, the concentration prepares students for research and teaching at the college or university level.

Coursework 

Coursework requirements complement and do not replace departmental/program requirements, and are as follows:

  • Five courses in the early modern period (for English or History, 1500-1750 | for Philosophy, 1600-1800), of which two courses must be in a discipline other than the one in which the student is receiving the degree.
  • Course in Paleography
  • Course in Latin Reading (this course is not required but may be taken for credit; fulfillment of the research tool in Latin is by exam only)
  • One course or workshop based upon bibliographic inquiry into the extensive collections of modern print and manuscripts housed in the Special Collections of the The Claremont Colleges Library

Research Tools 

For MA students, the Early Modern Studies concentration requires a second Research Tool.  The two Research Tools for the concentration must be completed through language exams in German or French and in Latin.  If a Latin Reading course is taken in preparation for the exam, this course may be used for credit toward the degree/concentration.

For PhD students, the Early Modern Studies concentration requires a third Research Tool.  The three Research Tools for the concentration must be completed through language exams in German, French, and Latin.  If a Latin Reading course is taken in preparation for the exam, this course may be used for credit toward the degree/concentration.

Note: in some cases, fulfilling the requirements of this concentration as well as the core requirements for the student’s degree may involve additional units or Research Tools.  Students should always consult with their academic advisor before adding a concentration to their degree program.

Hemispheric and Transnational Studies Concentration


Requirements
For MA Students
  • 16 units in seminars designated as “hemispheric or transnational” in scope
  • A capstone/final paper  (in Cultural Studies only) on hemispheric or transnational literatures or cultural theories
  • One language requirement (Research Tool) in Spanish, French, Portuguese, or Creole (other languages may be considered by student request.) 
For PhD Students  
  • 16 units in seminars designated as “hemispheric or transnational” in scope
  • A capstone/final paper  (in Cultural Studies only) on hemispheric or transnational literatures or cultural theories
  • One language requirement (Research Tool) in Spanish, French, Portuguese, or Creole (other languages may be considered by student request.)
  • Either a major or a minor qualifying field examination in Hemispheric/Transnational Studies (determined in consultation with the advisor).

Note: in some cases, fulfilling the requirements of this concentration as well as the core requirements for the student’s degree may involve additional units or Research Tools.  Students should always consult with their academic advisor before adding a concentration to their degree program.

 

Media Studies Concentration


Coursework. 12 units of approved Media Studies courses, taught by faculty of CGU or The Claremont Colleges, are required. For Cultural Studies students, one of the student’s Research Methods courses must be int he field of Media Studies.

Internship. A four-unit Internship course is optional. Internships are scheduled for approximately 100 hours.

Note: in some cases, fulfilling the requirements of this concentration as well as the core requirements for the student’s degree may involve additional units or Research Tools. Students should always consult with their academic advisor before adding a concentration to their degree program.

Museum Studies Concentration


Coursework. 8 units of approved courses in Museum Theory and History are required.

Internship. A four-unit Internship is optional. Internships are scheduled for approximately 100 hours.

Note: in some cases, fulfilling the requirements of this concentration as well as the core requirements for the student’s degree may involve additional units or Research Tools. Students should always consult with their academic advisor before adding a concentration to their degree program.