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Claremont Graduate University    
 
    
 
  Aug 19, 2017
 
2017-2018 Bulletin

Women's Studies in Religion, MA


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The Master of Arts in Women’s Studies in Religion (WSR) is designed to introduce students to the field of feminist scholarship in religion.  Students are given great flexibility in designing a course of study built upon a foundation of core courses which ensure grounding in the important methodologies in a selected field.  As part of their studies, students may also elect to do internships in agencies dealing with women or women’s issues through the Master of Arts in Applied Women’s Studies  program.

Students admitted to the MA in Women’s Studies in Religion should refer to the Religion Student Handbook for the year in which they begin the program for complete details.

Degree Requirements

Coursework. The program requires 40 units.  Coursework must be distributed as follows.

  • 12 units of courses in women’s studies in religion.  Courses must deal with religion from a feminist perspective, as Feminism and Process Thought; Gender, Violence, and Religion; and Matristics: Medieval Women’s Theology.
  • 12 units in religion, women’s studies, or related disciplines.
  • 12 units in methods courses.

Required methods courses are as follows.

  • REL 403 - Introduction to Women’s Studies in Religion.  This course explores the rapidly expanding field of women’s studies in religion from a multi-religious perspective.  A comparative approach is used to examine women’s reconceptualizations of the divine in the major religious traditions, issues of hermeneutics, analyses of women’s approach to sexuality, spirituality, ethics, and the environment.  The global context of feminism is highlighted by sessions devoted to women’s religious practices in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East.
  • REL 362 - Theories of Religion.  An introduction to methodological issues in the study of religion through a reading of classic theorists such as Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Freud, and Otto, and other notable examples of contemporary theory and interpretation, against the backdrop of the history of Christian thought and the rise of the human sciences in the post-Enlightenment West.
  • Feminist Theory.  Any course dealing with feminist methodological approaches to a discipline fulfills the feminist theory requirement.  Courses may include Feminist Theory, Feminist Epistemology, Feminism and Post-Colonialism, Feminism and Queer Theory, and Feminist Political Theory.

Advisory Group Meetings.  Students meet one each month for a meal and discussion in the home of one of the faculty members.  Led by a student facilitator, the agenda arises from issues raised in the classroom, such as the integration of coursework, written work, and the student’s own educational goals.  Once or twice each semester, students meet as group in the Women in Religion Salon to hear faculty and/or student presentations on recent research.

Language Requirement.  Women’s Studies in Religion is an international field with valuable scholarship being done in Europe, Asia, and Latin America.  To enable a student to participate in this larger world of scholarship, a reading knowledge of French, German, or Spanish is required.  Proficiency is demonstrated by passing the French, German, or Spanish exam.  The examination consists of translating a text from the literature of Women’s Studies in Religion.

Thesis.  To ensure students develop the skills for writing a publishable piece of work, a Master’s Thesis is required.  The program utilizes a protocol similar to doctoral requirements for composition of a dissertation.  Thesis requirements are as follows.

  • Research project must be in the student’s area of specialization
  • Thesis of 60-85 pages in length must be prepared in conjunction with the student’s advisor or advisory committee
  • Three readers are required
  • Student must pass an oral defense of the thesis, lasting approximately one hour

Upon successfully passing the oral examination and revising the manuscript with any corrections or revisions, the student submits the work to the registrar following established guidelinesDegree completion deadlines, announced in the Academic Calendar, apply.

University Policies.  University policies detailed in the Academic Policies  section of the Bulletin apply.

American Studies Concentration


Student will work closely with a faculty advisor to pursue an intellectually unified course of study that will include seminars in their department as well as seminars cross-listed with participating CGU departments and The Claremont Colleges. A minimum of four seminars should be taken in the student’s home department, and a minimum of two seminars in other disciplines. Interested students should discuss this concentration with their advisor.

Note: in some cases, fulfilling the requirements of this concentration as well as the core requirements for the student’s degree may involve additional units or Research Tools.  Students should always consult with their academic advisor before adding a concentration to their degree program.

 

Continental Philosophy Concentration


Requirements for the concentration are:

  • Four courses in Kantian and post-Kantian continental philosophy with the approval of advisor (Note: the presumption is that pre-Kantian philosophies will not be considered a course in continental although, on an individual basis, may be considered upon the recommendation of the instructor)
  • Capstone/final paper on continental thought (for Philosophy or Cultural Studies MA only)
  • For Philosophy PhD students, one folio paper in the area of continental thought
  • French or German as a Research Tool

Note: in some cases, fulfilling the requirements of this concentration as well as the core requirements for the student’s degree may involve additional units or Research Tools.  Students should always consult with their academic advisor before adding a concentration to their degree program.

Early Modern Studies Concentration


The Early Modern Studies concentration encompasses study in the disciplines of English, History, and Philosophy, while retaining disciplinary focus in one of those fields.  Students interested in this concentration should consult with Dr. Lori Anne Ferrell.

For master’s students, this discrete course of study complements coursework in archival and museum studies and/or prepares students for application to doctoral programs in early modern, Renaissance, or Reformation literature, history, or philosophy.

For doctoral students, the concentration prepares students for research and teaching at the college or university level.

Coursework 

Coursework requirements complement and do not replace departmental/program requirements, and are as follows:

  • Five courses in the early modern period (for English or History, 1500-1750 | for Philosophy, 1600-1800), of which two courses must be in a discipline other than the one in which the student is receiving the degree.
  • Course in Paleography
  • Course in Latin Reading (this course is not required but may be taken for credit; fulfillment of the research tool in Latin is by exam only)
  • One course or workshop based upon bibliographic inquiry into the extensive collections of modern print and manuscripts housed in the Special Collections of the The Claremont Colleges Library

Research Tools 

For MA students, the Early Modern Studies concentration requires a second Research Tool.  The two Research Tools for the concentration must be completed through language exams in German or French and in Latin.  If a Latin Reading course is taken in preparation for the exam, this course may be used for credit toward the degree/concentration.

For PhD students, the Early Modern Studies concentration requires a third Research Tool.  The three Research Tools for the concentration must be completed through language exams in German, French, and Latin.  If a Latin Reading course is taken in preparation for the exam, this course may be used for credit toward the degree/concentration.

Note: in some cases, fulfilling the requirements of this concentration as well as the core requirements for the student’s degree may involve additional units or Research Tools.  Students should always consult with their academic advisor before adding a concentration to their degree program.

Hemispheric and Transnational Studies Concentration


Requirements for the concentration are:

Requirements

For MA Students
  • 16 units in seminars designated as “hemispheric or transnational” in scope
  • A capstone/final paper  (in Cultural Studies only) on hemispheric or transnational literatures or cultural theories
  • One language requirement (Research Tool) in Spanish, French, Portuguese, or Creole (other languages may be considered by student request.) 
For PhD Students  
  • 16 units in seminars designated as “hemispheric or transnational” in scope
  • A capstone/final paper  (in Cultural Studies only) on hemispheric or transnational literatures or cultural theories
  • One language requirement (Research Tool) in Spanish, French, Portuguese, or Creole (other languages may be considered by student request.)
  • Either a major or a minor qualifying field examination in Hemispheric/Transnational Studies (determined in consultation with the advisor).

Note: in some cases, fulfilling the requirements of this concentration as well as the core requirements for the student’s degree may involve additional units or Research Tools.  Students should always consult with their academic advisor before adding a concentration to their degree program.

 

Media Studies Concentration


Coursework. 12 units of approved Media Studies courses, taught by faculty of CGU or The Claremont Colleges, are required. For Cultural Studies students, one of the student’s Research Methods courses must be int he field of Media Studies.

Internship. A four-unit Internship course is optional. Internships are scheduled for approximately 100 hours.

Note: in some cases, fulfilling the requirements of this concentration as well as the core requirements for the student’s degree may involve additional units or Research Tools. Students should always consult with their academic advisor before adding a concentration to their degree program.

Museum Studies Concentration


Coursework. 8 units of approved courses in Museum Theory and History are required.

Internship. A four-unit Internship is optional. Internships are scheduled for approximately 100 hours.

Note: in some cases, fulfilling the requirements of this concentration as well as the core requirements for the student’s degree may involve additional units or Research Tools. Students should always consult with their academic advisor before adding a concentration to their degree program.

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